Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Celebrates 80th Anniversary

AANow in its 80th year, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has come a long way since the programs humble beginnings in Akron, Ohio in 1935. Through the AA community, millions of people have found a new way of life through recovery – a life free from alcohol and drugs.

Active members of AA and those who have yet to experience recovery, can find support at any one of the 115,326 groups in 180 countries around the globe. It is hard to believe that it all began with just two men with a desire to stay sober. Today, there are millions of people actively working a program of recovery in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous, striving to practice the principles of the program in all their affairs.

Come Together

While the Middle East is not known for heavy alcohol consumption, it may please you to learn that people are experiencing the miracle of recovery in the rooms of AA there as well. In Fact, 100 AA delegates from 15 Asian nations met in Dubai last week for the Alcoholics Anonymous’ regional biannual meeting, Gulf News reports. The purpose of the gathering was to discuss public communications strategies for the next two years.

“The purpose of the regional meetings is to see how we can, at a country-to-country level, carry the message,” said John L_, Asia Oceania AA regional chairman. He adds that one reason AA has been so successful is “one alcoholic carries the message to another alcoholic.”

Spreading The Message

Active members of AA often say ‘you cannot keep it [recovery], if you do not give it away.’ Spreading a message of hope to people who are facing seemingly insurmountable odds is what keeps the program moving forward. People struggling with addiction are guided by people in recovery who have come before them, and in turn they too will hopefully pay what they have learned forward.

One thing is certain, recovery is a shared experience.

We would like to thank everyone who has made an effort to work a program of recovery and spread the message that “we can, and do recover.”

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Please contact Next Step Intervention if you are struggling with alcohol. We can assist you in finding the right treatment which will help you start your journey of recovery.

Navigating Social Situations Involving Alcohol

alcoholRecovering from a substance use disorder is challenging to say the least, around many corners are obstacles that can derail one’s program. In early recovery, sponsors in 12-step programs and counselors at treatment centers advise you to stay clear from situations where alcohol will be present – known as risky situations. Being around others who are consuming alcohol can be dangerous.

Unfortunately, alcohol is everywhere and avoiding situations where alcohol is present is often easier said than done. Holidays and work gatherings are common situations that people in recovery need to face, but it is possible to abstain from alcohol and have a good time. It is important for people working a program of recovery to stay close to their support network, if ever you feel shaky help is always a phone call away.

The Life of A Former Drinker

Alcoholics who give up drinking will find times in their recovery where they will have to navigate social situations where alcohol is involved. Some people will let their associates know they don’t drink, whereas others will try to remain inconspicuous about the fact that they abstain from alcohol. A new study has examined the wide variety of approaches that people who don’t drink take when it comes to how and whether to tell people that they don’t drink, ScienceDaily reports. The research was part of a larger study on how non-drinkers handle social events.

“The findings tell us that former problem drinkers can find it tricky to navigate social situations where alcohol is involved, and makes clear it’s important to support those who aren’t drinking and not push non-drinkers to disclose their reasons for not having a drink,” says Lynsey Romo, study lead and an assistant professor of communication at North Carolina State University.

The study involved 11 former problem drinkers who were interviewed by the researchers. The participants length of sobriety ranged from one to 19 years, according to the article. Some people were open about the fact they didn’t drink, while others tried to avoid the situation outright by holding a cup the whole time or saying “no” when offered a drink.

Staying Social In Sobriety Without Stigma

“We found that former problem drinkers still want to be social, of course, but that they had to find ways to determine whether to disclose their non-drinking status to others,” Romo says. “Study participants said they felt the need to weigh how much they should tell other people. Essentially, they assessed the risk of being socially stigmatized if they were open about not drinking or about being in recovery.”

The research was published in the journal Health Communication.

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If you are or your loved one is struggling with alcohol, please contact N2 Treatment. We can assist you in finding the right treatment which will help you start your journey of recovery.

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